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Table of Contents
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 169-170

“Learn from Home!” A critical incident report on remote curriculum delivery in physiotherapy


Department of Physiotherapy, JSS College of Physiotherapy, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Date of Submission03-Aug-2022
Date of Decision09-Sep-2022
Date of Acceptance06-Dec-2022
Date of Web Publication19-Jan-2023

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Sandeep Harish Padanthaya
JSS College of Physiotherapy, Mysore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijptr.ijptr_116_22

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How to cite this article:
Rahman A M, Tejaswini S N, Padanthaya SH. “Learn from Home!” A critical incident report on remote curriculum delivery in physiotherapy. Indian J Phys Ther Res 2022;4:169-70

How to cite this URL:
Rahman A M, Tejaswini S N, Padanthaya SH. “Learn from Home!” A critical incident report on remote curriculum delivery in physiotherapy. Indian J Phys Ther Res [serial online] 2022 [cited 2023 Feb 1];4:169-70. Available from: https://www.ijptr.org/text.asp?2022/4/2/169/368047



Teaching and learning are multifaceted processes that aim to incorporate new knowledge, behaviors, and skills with various learning experiences.[1] The teaching and learning process depends on the educator's assessment of learning needs, the method and stage of imparting knowledge to students, and the interaction between students and teachers.[2]

Despite the availability of diverse teaching methods, health professions in low- and middle-income countries like India, by and large, continue to follow the teacher-centered approach. The teacher-centered approach includes direct instruction (teaching through lectures and teacher-led demonstrations), flipped classroom (recorded lectures), and kinesthetic learning (facilitating students to do, make, or create).

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2, was identified in December 2019 and declared as pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020.[3] The resulting movement restrictions, enforced by several countries, caused 1.6 billion children and young people (80% of the world's enrolled students) to drop out of physical classes in over 161 countries, leading to a global learning crisis.[4]

To overcome this situation, educational institutions worldwide have gradually adopted a strategy of delivering online curricula as an alternative to traditional (in-class and on-campus) education. This has been followed in most health science and educational institutions in India.

It is well known that the paradigm shift from physical lectures to online courses can limit the ability of physical therapy students to learn. Academic experts in the field of physical therapy studied the effectiveness of online curriculum delivery based on feedback from interns who were exposed to the online curriculum for approximately 2 years.

As a result, feedback from a cohort of 300 students revealed that 57% of students were dissatisfied with the acquisition of theoretical knowledge, 75% of students with practical skills, and 61% of students with clinical discussion sessions.

From the survey results, it is evident that the transitions from physical to online classes hampered curriculum delivery. On examining the critical incidents as signposts for new paths, it turned out that there is an insufficient fulfillment of the curriculum delivery. Students reported overwhelmingly negative feelings regarding the delivery of online curricula in the physical therapy profession due to the lack of application of learned theoretical knowledge in practice for practical skills in assessment/therapy techniques and exercise strategies, the scarcity of library resources, the increased screen time during online sessions, and the lack of extracurricular activities. This is consistent with findings from the previous literature. Paul Chesterton surveyed 236 physiotherapy students to understand the student's perceptions of online curriculum delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, the students surveyed (79%) felt that the provision of online learning delivery had a negative impact on their understanding of the subject and was disadvantaged compared to traditional classroom teaching, resulting in low student satisfaction, low engagement, and a poor ability to practice practical skills.[3]

These findings of our study could stimulate reflection on the need for effective policies and measures to highlight mastery of the skills to successfully deliver online curriculum in any unprecedented state in the coming days to improve the curriculum delivery among physical therapy professions, leading to mutual benefit for teachers and students.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Vikaspedia.in. Vikaspedia Domains; 2020. Available from: https://vikaspedia.in/education/teachers-corner/teaching-and-learning. [Last accessed on 2020 Oct 24].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Igi-global.com. What is Teaching-Learning Process | IGI Global; 2020. Available from: https://www.igi-global.com/dictionary/current-and-future-trends-in-higher-education-learning/48941. [Last accessed on 2020 Oct 24].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Chesterton P, Richardson M, Tears C. Student physiotherapists perceptions of online curriculum delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. BMC Med Educ 2022;22:440.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Bank Blogs. Educational Challenges and Opportunities of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic; 2020. Available from: https://blogs.worldbank.org/education/educational-challenges-and-opportunities-covid-19-pandemic. [Last accessed on 2020 Oct 24].  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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